Tag Archives: Mathematica

Pade approximants: a case study (iii)

We are now going to explore the analytic structure of the Padé approximants for our example [1], [2]. The study (iii) The limit for the Padé approximants and  exist for all . This is much stronger than the Taylor series, … Continue reading

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Pade approximants: a case study (ii)

In the previous article we have seen how to calculate Padé approximations on the example of The study (ii) We are now going to see how efficient Padé’s ansatz is and compare it to the well known series representation . … Continue reading

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Pade approximants: a case study (i)

This post was inspired by a lecture series of Carl Bender [1]. The case I will consider the function on the complex plane, defined by Have a look at a complex plot of it Some properties: has a a logarithmic … Continue reading

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Who am I?

Here is a little snippet on how to make a fun game with the help of Mathematica: “Who am I?” An animated gif which will slowly reveal its contents… A guessing game for the whole family! We start off by … Continue reading

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Guess who?

Stare at the formula (Mathematica notation) and take a guess what it represents: {((-4 Sin[1/8 – 9 t] – 54/5 Sin[1/5 – 5 t] – 129/4 Sin[1/4 – t] + 76/7 Sin[2 t + 29/10] + 17/8 Sin[3 t + … Continue reading

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Quick tip: changing the userbase directory in Mathematica (Linux)

Recently, I came across the problem of readdressing the Mathematica user folder for a sort-of-portable version of Mathematica. In Linux this folder resides in the user’s home directory as ~/.Mathematica and contains all user defined settings as well as additional … Continue reading

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Ulam’s spiral in Mathematica

Today we’re having a little fun with Mathematica. We will generate a visualization of the Ulam spiral. To this end the natural numbers are arranged in a spiral pattern, 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 38 17 16 15 … Continue reading

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